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Mar112014

01:45:32 am

Plantar Fasciitis Taping


There are a number of methods which can be used to reduce the pain from plantar fasciitis. Treating plantar fasciitis usually involves medication to ease the pain. This is most commonly anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID's) which are helpful in alleviating pain as well as reducing inflammation. Sometimes corticosteroids may be administered either topically or by injection into the plantar fascia directly, although this is usually reserved for only the most severe cases. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) can be used to good effect, with the treatment using painless sound waves to help the healing process.

First check your shoes for too much midfoot flexibility and check your training for changes. A detailed evaluation of changes in your training is necessary. You should start with what is called "relative rest" which means a decrease in workout intensity, duration of session and decrease in the number of sessions per week. The most important part of self treatment for this condition is being sure that your shoes offer sufficient stability and are optimal in controlling the forces that contribute to plantar fasciitis and heel spurs. Check your running shoes to make sure that they are not excessively worn. This is vital!

Many people with Plantar Fasciitis experience a sharp heel pain in the morning, when taking the first steps after getting out of bed. This pain comes from the tightening of the plantar fascia that occurs during sleep. Stretching and massaging the plantar fascia before standing up will help reduce heel pain for the rest of your day! Massaging the plantar fascia can be done simply by rolling a tennisball (or rolling pin) under the foot, all the way from the heel to the toes. Keep rolling the ball or pin under the foot for about 5 minutes.

Heel pain is common complaint in runners. Actually, heel pain is common in all people. 40% of all visits to podiatrists in the U.S. are because of heel pain. Of all of the different causes of heel pain, the vast majority is due to a condition known as plantar fasciitis. This is an inflammation in the band of tissue (the plantar fascia) that runs from the heel to the toes. This condition is most often caused by a tight achilles tendon or poor foot structure such as overly flat feet or high arches.

Here are some plantar fasciitis exercises that are quite helpful. Stretch your calf before getting out of bed, but do it gently. Pull your toes up with your hand till you feel a stretch along the ball of your foot to your heel for couple of times for about thirty seconds. Do exercises that stretch your lower leg muscles. Get someone to massage the tissues at the bottom of your foot. Another alternative is to roll a tennis ball gently under the hurting foot. A frozen water bottle is a good replacement for tennis ball to control inflammation.plantar fasciitis shoes

During sleep, feet normally point downward, which allows the plantar fascia to contract. Night splints are used to keep the ankle at 90 degrees during sleep instead of allowing the foot to rest in flexion. Abnormal foot structure increases the chance one will develop plantar fasciitis. People with high arches have greater gravitational force across the plantar fascia while feet with low arches roll inward more during with walking putting tension on plantar fasciitis. Night splints can prevent contracture of the calf muscles, control abnormal pronation or the tendency of foot to roll inward, and maintain the anatomical length of the plantar fascia without stretching.

I tried customized orthotics that I wore in my shoes for a while that seemed to cause more problems than I began with. I got them altered every two weeks but ended up with pain in different and additional places in my foot. The Strassburg Sock helped some but it wasn't that comfortable to sleep in. Its a sock with a strap that pulls your foot toward your shin that helps stretch out the bottom of your foot. My foot felt a little better but I was not well rested, so not worth the trade off.

Patients with low arches theoretically have a decreased ability to absorb the forces generated by the impact of foot strike. 5 The three most commonly used mechanical corrections are arch taping, over-the-counter arch supports and custom orthotics. Arch taping and orthotics were found to be significantly better than use of NSAIDs, cortisone injection or heel cups in one randomized treatment study. 8 Arch taping was cited by 2 percent of patients as the treatment that worked best for plantar fasciitis in another study. 3 A single taping treatment is much less expensive than an over-the-counter arch support or an orthotic.

Above were some of the plantar fasciitis treatment options. Whether the soreness is light or perhaps severe, it will always be recommended to look for consultation from your foot as well as ankle physician. He can look at things properly as well as recommend an individual the finest therapy for plantar fasciitis depending on your foot framework and the seriousness of pain. This may prevent further problems and also can help you come out of the discomfort swiftly. Bear in mind, like all the other areas of the body, feet are also important. In the end, they may be the ones which support you almost everywhere. About the Author

Night splinting is another treatment which aims to stretch out the plantar fascia. As its name suggests, a night splint is a device you wear while you sleep which keeps your ankle dorsiflexed. The theory is that the “first-step pain” that is the hallmark of plantar fasciitis is caused by the arch healing at night without any tension on it. In the morning, the healing is disrupted by the tension put on the arch when you get out of bed. “The Sock” is a regular knee-high sock with a strap that runs from the toes to the kneecap. plantar fasciitis

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